Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Replacement Toilet Lids and Seats - This Is Why You Should Never Flush Dental Floss Down the Toilet - This Old Toilet 800-658-4521






A few things that should never go down your toilet include cotton pads, hair — and somewhat surprisingly, floss. While these little pieces of string might seem innocent enough to toss in your bowl, it's made out of nylon or Teflon so it isn't biodegradable and doesn't break down over time, which can cause some serious plumbing issues.
And if you're a daily flosser (which you should be!), throwing those tiny pieces in your toilet every day will add up fast. "Floss can combine with other items, such as single-use wipes (like baby wipes), and form balls that can grow quite sizable and can clog sewers and pumps," Rosales-Ramirez told The Huffington Post. "Sometimes these items also combine with tree roots and grease and create huge problems for sewer systems."
If you need further proof that this simple habit is a major mistake, these pictures should do the trick (sorry in advance).

source: http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/news/a46297/never-flush-dental-floss-down-toilet/
by Lauren Smith
http://www.thisoldtoilet.com

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Replacement Toilet Lids and Seats - DToilet Seat Art Museum Owner to Vacate His Throne - This Old Toilet 800-658-4521

Barney Smith explains different pieces in collection at Barney Smith's Toilet Seat Art Museum.



Barney Smith explains different pieces in his collection at the Toilet Seat Art Museum.

Those seeking relief from San Antonio’s more staid cultural bastions have long found it behind the unassuming doors of Barney Smith’s Alamo Heights garage. Since opening in 1992, his Toilet Seat Museum – apparently the only one of its kind in the world – has drawn visitors from all 50 states and more than 80 foreign countries.

A vivacious 96-year-old, Smith presides over his collection from a folding chair, happy to share the stories behind his seats with anyone who wishes to linger. His days of commode-decorating are by no means at an end, with new works always on the way. But as he nears 100, Smith has started to consider his collection’s future. He and his family are waiting for the perfect buyer, one who will keep the collection together and open to the public.

Smith’s unlikely hobby had surprisingly logical beginnings, when, at 26, the handsome young master plumber was inspired by the wooden plaques his father made to mount their most prized hunting trophies. Smith, no doubt as wry and charming then as he is now, took a cue from his trade and made his own mount out of an old toilet seat cover, thereby sparking what would prove to be a seven-decade-long passion. The seats, it should be noted, are all brand new, given to him by plumbing companies.

He soon moved beyond antlers to other objects, mostly mementos from his life and travels. “He’s always had collections,” his granddaughter and next door neighbor, Heather Janes, recalled, adding that he came from a very artistic family, with parents and brothers who spent their lives working with their hands – be it in their trade or creative pursuits.

When asked what his beloved wife of 74 years, Velma Louise, thought of the project, Smith replied that she just “liked to know that I was out here working.” After all, “Seventy-four years…for a man, that’s a long time to be with one woman. And for a woman, that’s a long time to be with one man.”

Smith admits that her support was initially limited – she made him promise to stop at 500 seats. Since he now has more than 1,300, it’s safe to assume that her tolerance expanded along with his collection. But to mark the threshold, his 500th is covered in dog tags. “And I’ve been in the dog house ever since.”

A photograph of Barney and the late Louise Smith hangs in Barney Smith's Toilet Seat Art Museum.

After his wife’s death from Alzheimer’s a few years ago, Smith sometimes worries about his own memory, which forms an essential component of his interactions with visitors. Unfortunately, in a recent piece on his museum, the San Antonio Express-News misstated that he had dementia, which his children and grandchildren hasten to clarify is not the case. If any faults in his memory exist, they’re no more than the minor foibles of a mind already holding more than its fair share of recollections.

His family, including three children, seven grandchildren,12 great-grandchildren, and two eagerly awaited great-great-grandchildren, are apparently just as amused by Smith’s hobby as the rest of his visitors. His grandson even made him a Facebook page so contented visitors could share images and impressions.
They’re an exceptionally close group, bound by shared faith and mutual respect. They’ve upheld a tradition of monthly family dinners since the 1970s, and many lend helping hands at the museum.
“We never dreamed it would turn into anything like this,” Janes said.

Smith’s life’s work has not only attracted visitors from far-flung environs such as Saudi Arabia, Australia, and India, but also won him the attention of various news shows, including The View. His museum has also proved something of a local gathering place, drawing neighbors back again and again. On his birthday last year, the mayor of Alamo Heights proclaimed May 25 “Barney Smith Day.”

Every day at about 1 p.m., an eager crowd of visitors gathers outside, waiting for the tell-tale screech of the corrugated metal doors that heralds their entry into what is undoubtedly one of San Antonio’s most unusual attractions. Smith’s meticulously kept guest books attest to more than 1,000 visitors a year. These sightseers are remarkably varied: on the day I went, I encountered one enthusiastic Geocacher, several families with thrilled little boys in tow, and three well-dressed women from Fort Worth, who – rather unexpectedly – said the Toilet Seat Museum was the deciding factor in favor of their weekend visit to San Antonio.


Some might question what draw this museum has for those who could otherwise visit the Alamo, the Spanish-colonial Missions, or any number of well-appointed art museums. Novelty value certainly plays a part, along with a wealth of photographic opportunities, and dinner party fodder sufficient to enliven even the deadliest lulls in conversation.

But the museum is not, as I first anticipated, devoted to the history of the toilet seat, although it does have one historic example from the 19th century – “If you sat on that on a hot day you wouldn’t need air conditioning,” Smith quipped – as well as the “widest toilet seat in the world.” The Guinness Book of World Records has approached Smith twice to be canonized in its pages, but he hasn’t found the time to fill out the necessary paperwork.

The seats themselves are mostly of a personal nature, made to commemorate birthdays, vacations, and anniversaries. One is mounted with parts of his beloved old motorcycle; another with a hornet nest that once tormented him; and one, covered in washers, bears the plumber’s wisdom: “Without running water, there are no leaking faucets;” Some are decorated with gifts others have brought him; 50 with the state flag, bird, and flower from each of the states (as well as the signatures of visitors from their native states); and a few have been graced by the hands of fellow artists.

Others – featuring the likes of “O.J. Simpson’s Glove,” “Willie Nelson’s Pony Tail,” a piece of Saddam Hussein’s toilet, and  $1 million in shredded money from the Federal Reserve – are merely expressions of Smith’s tongue-in-cheek sense of humor. He jokes that one toilet seat bearing the Nativity scene is “in good standing.” But the real draw, as more than 200 glowing Facebook reviews attest, is Smith himself.
t’s an unexpectedly humane collection, attesting to nearly a century of life well lived, documenting everything from Smith’s vow renewal to his dental work. He saves his personal favorite for last: a mounted easel and paints, framing a poem he memorized in school at age 12, “When Earth’s Last Picture is Painted.” Touchingly, he still recites it to every visitor in parting.

Barney Smith explains the origins of his collection at Barney Smith's Toilet Seat Art Museum.

Already he’s been approached by several interested buyers, some with novelty art collections of their own. Smith’s preference would be to see it go to a good home within his lifetime, one that keeps the collection together and respects his faith and history. But until the right custodian comes along, he’ll keep his doors open for anyone who wants to be reminded to savor life without taking it too seriously.


source: https://therivardreport.com/toilet-seat-art-museum-owner-to-vacate-his-throne/
by Bonnie Arbittier/Rivard Report

http://www.thisoldtoilet.com




Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Replacement Toilet Lids and Seats - Don't buy a new toilet until you read this: Not all toilets give same performance - This Old Toilet 800-658-4521



Testers compared 2  brands of toilet with same price tag and found drastic  performance differences.  CR photo



When you make changes to your bathroom, the toilet is an important part of the equation. What is there to consider? The shape and style, right? And whether it will fit the right distance from the wall. But oh, there is so much more!
Consumer Reports tests to see if toilets effectively wash away debris, whether the bowl is left clean after a flush and how water-efficient they are.
What makes one toilet better than another? To illustrate, CR selected two toilets that cost the same - $150. But one is a recommended model, and the other has the lowest score in their ratings. Why?
The Mansfield Alto got only fair marks for waste removal. In several tests the sponge debris stayed in the bowl.
But the Delta Prelude does its main job very well.
And how clean is the bowl surface afterwards? One CR test is to draw a water soluble marker ring around the inside of the rim, to see if one flush can wash it away.
The Mansfield bowl was only “fair,” with markings left behind after each flush. A good performer has the power to rinse away most of the debris, most of the time.
The CR recommended Delta model did an excellent job powerfully rinsing the ring away.
And when you shop , check out the efficiency rating. The Delta uses less water than the Mansfield - just 1.28 gallons per flush versus 1.6 gallons.
If you have a toilet from before 1990, you can save 19 gallons per person, per day by switching to one with the EPA’s WaterSense sticker on it.
And to find out if yours is leaking and needs to be fixed or replaced, put a few drops of food coloring into the tank. In 15 minutes if there is color in the bowl - you’ve got a leak.
source: http://komonews.com/news/consumer/dont-buy-a-new-toilet-until-you-read-this-not-all-toilets-give-same-performance
by consumer reports

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Replacement Toilet Lids and Seats - Tokyo is upgrading airport toilets with voice guides for the blind and waiting areas for service dogs - This Old Toilet 800-658-4521


A therapy dog wears a Superman Halloween costume as part of a program to de-stress passengers at the international boarding gate area of LAX airport in Los Angeles, California, United States, October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson - GF20000035658


In preparation for an expected 40 million visitors during Tokyo’s 2020 Olympic games, the Japanese government has launched a national toilet improvement campaign.

A good restroom is a high expression of Japanese hospitality or omotenashi; in 2015, the national government established an annual “Japan Toilet Grand Prize” to encourage innovations in toilet technology. The new campaign focuses on public facilities, and aims to redesign “comfort rooms” for all types of users from around the world.

Japan is already world-famous for its high tech Toto washlet toilets—a delightful self-cleaning unit with heated seats, dryers, and deodorizers. But the government’s challenge in preparation for the Olympics is to rethink the entire experience—from mitigating lines in bathrooms to standardizing toilet icons.

In preparation for an expected 40 million visitors during Tokyo’s 2020 Olympic games, the Japanese government has launched a national toilet improvement campaign.

A good restroom is a high expression of Japanese hospitality or omotenashi; in 2015, the national government established an annual “Japan Toilet Grand Prize” to encourage innovations in toilet technology. The new campaign focuses on public facilities, and aims to redesign “comfort rooms” for all types of users from around the world.

Japan is already world-famous for its high tech Toto washlet toilets—a delightful self-cleaning unit with heated seats, dryers, and deodorizers. But the government’s challenge in preparation for the Olympics is to rethink the entire experience—from mitigating lines in bathrooms to standardizing toilet icons.

Tokyo’s Narita airport is the first to be overhauled for the Olympics, with its “total toilet makeover” drive. New “designer restrooms” opened at the Narita International Airport earlier this month, featuring not the singing toilets, beeping bidets or sanitary wipes for smartphones that have awed visitors to Japan in the past, but rather thoughtfully-considered accessibility features.

Two new bathrooms in Narita’s Terminal 2 include a voice-guidance system that talks blind users through the space, and a light alert system to help signal to the deaf in emergencies. There are also designated double-wide stalls for travelers with service animals. These pet-friendly units have leash hooks, pet mats and cans for dog waste disposal, Japan Times reports.

“We decided to equip all bathrooms with universal design and renovate the toilets as well,” Naoki Ohata, spokesperson for the Narita Airport. Universal design means eliminating barriers for the most number of users. Universal design touches (pdf) in Narita’s airport restrooms include:

Directions for visually impaired
Braille and tactile information panels
Toilet bowls with handrails
Hooks for putting canes and umbrellas
Space for putting belongings
Lowered washbasins
Wider stalls so you can change clothes
Children’s toilet facilities
Wheelchair compatible toilets
Emergency alarms
Ostomate facilities
Beds

Narita has earmarked ¥5 billion ($46 million) to refurbish the airport’s remaining 148 bathrooms. Japan’s busiest international hub also announced plans to phase out traditional washiki squat-toilets in favor of traditional Western-style units.

Even after the Olympics, these improved facilities will be vital to Japan’s increasingly infirm population. “Japan is working to make cities more accessible and livable because the population is aging,” explains Atsushi Kato chairman of the lavatory research center Japan Toilet Labo to Japan Times. “Everyone is trying to create a society where the elderly can enjoy being outdoors, travel or shop.”

source: https://qz.com/1077828/tokyo-is-upgrading-airport-toilets-with-voice-guides-for-the-blind-and-waiting-areas-for-service-dogs/
by Anne Quito

http://www.thisoldtoilet.com


Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Replacement Toilet Lids and Seats - This toilet themed restaurant is guaranteed to make you think twice about that chocolate ice-cream- This Old Toilet 800-658-4521



A CHAIN of toilet themed restaurants in Taiwan is single-handedly demolishing the old adage “you don’t s**t where you eat”.
Modern Toilet celebrates bowel movements and quick nips to the loo with a variety of dishes that look just like POO.


You don't see this on Come Dine With Me

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You don’t see this on Come Dine With Me

All the dishes and drinks are served in mini toilets, bidet-shaped bowls and mugs inspired by urinals and she-pees.
While the idea of it is enough to make most people gag, it’s popular with Taiwanese hipsters – and families.
Unlike in the West, where faecal matter is seen as something to be flushed away and not thought off again, poo is regarded as something cute and lucky in Chinese culture.
Superstitious Chinese folk believe stepping in poo is a good omen, and you are bound to receive good luck.
Similarly, if you dream about poo it is said to be a sign that something good is coming your way.
But regardless of old wives’ tales, it’s hard to believe that anyone would be pleased to see what is being served to them at Modern Toilet.


This dinner looks particularly grim

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This dinner looks particularly grim

Piles of poo are all over the restaurant - but thankfully they're even edible or fake

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Piles of poo are all over the restaurant – but thankfully they’re even edible or fake

There are even tiny toilets to serve truffles in... at least we hope that's a truffle

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There are even tiny toilets to serve truffles in… at least we hope that’s a truffle

From horrifying thick turds of chocolate ice-cream to steaming portions of curry dished up in a mini lav, it’s less feast for the senses and more a game of mind over matter.
Adding to the bathroom ambience of the restaurant is the seating, with diners taking their seat on actual toilets.



On the menu they can enjoy either Chinese hot pot dishes, or European classics such as spaghetti or pork chop.
Every meal comes with a complimentary green tea and a serving of the eye-popping chocolate ice-cream that really could double for a poo.


The outside of the restaurant holds few clues about the wonders that await inside

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The outside of the restaurant holds few clues about the wonders that await inside

If you were drinking from a cup shaped like a portable urinal would you opt for apple juice?

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If you were drinking from a cup shaped like a portable urinal would you opt for apple juice?

There are Modern Toilet restaurants all over Taiwan, with the first one opening back in 2004.
In 2013 a toilet themed restaurant opened in Los Angeles.


Diners are served their main meals in dishes shaped like small toilets

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Diners are served their main meals in dishes shaped like small toilets

Even the washrooms are toilet-inspired

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Even the washrooms are toilet-inspired

However, US diners weren’t impressed with Magic Restroom’s menu, which included Golden Poop (brown curry), Constipation (noodles with soybean paste) and Smells Like Poop (braised pork over rice).
Puddings were even more likely in prompt a dry-heave, with Bloody Number Two (vanilla-strawberry sundae) and Black Poop (chocolate sundae) both up for grabs before the restaurant quietly closed down eight months after opening.


It's probably worth going to the restaurant just to take a picture like this

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It’s probably worth going to the restaurant just to take a picture like this

Diners sit on toilets as they eat their faeces-inspired meals

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Diners sit on toilets as they eat their faeces-inspired meals

The restaurant chain just loves toilets and all they stand (or sit) for

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The restaurant chain just loves toilets and all they stand (or sit) for

source; https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/food/4366928/this-toilet-themed-restaurant-is-guaranteed-to-make-you-think-twice-about-that-chocolate-ice-cream/
by Emma Gritt
http://www.thisoldtoilet.com